Matt Green: Playful

The little upstairs room at the Quadrant in which we, Matt Green’s audience, squeeze ourselves is packed. Always a good sign - particularly at a comedy gig – and it continues to fill up throughout the show as late comers are welcomed to seats right on the front of the stage. But it’s okay, Green is an affable character and the kind of comedian you wouldn’t mind sitting next to. Perhaps it’s his face which is, he’s been told, 18th Century.

Chatty observational comedy is Green’s forte and his stories generally provoke high volumes of laughter from the crowd. The set kicks off with the general getting to know you audience banter and in the first five minutes we’ve covered relationships, sex and jobs. Unusually, I think everyone in the audience may have been hoping this lovely comedian would pick on them.

Green remains the right side of the offensive comedy line and stories of his travels - often around various different toilets - and life with his girlfriend go down very well. But the show is a mix of comedic styles as one liners and jokes of a more political nature are attempted with not so great effect; if Green stuck to the stories he may well gain that extra star of perfection.

His comments on modern life are spot on, and the now compulsory iPhone anecdote is truly funny. The show ends with another story about lavatories, and high praise really is deserved when you’re a comedian who can actually make toilet humour funny. But the one about the rat in the bag takes my prize for best story. What’s it about? Well you’ll just have to watch the show to find out.

Since you’re here…

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Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
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The Blurb

3,600 seconds of brilliant jokes,stories,swearing,fun and games. 'An hour of classic stand up expertly delivered.' **** (Broadway Baby) 'A perfectly paced hour' **** (The List) **** (ThreeWeeks)

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