Margaret Cho - Cho Dependent

‘I’m famous in America you know, like, seriously’. Oh honey, with a show like that? We completely believe you.Cho stands upon the stage clad in a black t-shirt and black leather boots. She is fearless and delivers her jokes with measured timing that makes her set seem conversational. Often the crowd answer her back, showing she truly connects with them.Cho has a unique perspective and because of this her comments are refreshing. She has material on all aspects of her identity: Being American, being a celebrity, being Korean and being bisexual. Her style is frank and there are no topics too gruesome to be ignored. She freely admits to drug taking and has delicious Sarah Palin material.This show is highly sexually charged and sometimes even grotesque. She goes so far as to make one woman in the back row to yell out seriously ‘stop, please stop’. But Cho looks at her, pauses, and carries on regardless.She has incredible stories of her sexual exploits but also has side-splitting impressions of her family – most notably her impression of her mother who, instead of using tape, ‘liked to stick things together with rice’ and of her uncle who says ‘people think we’re ugly but they don’t know shit’ are hilarious. Ultimately Cho is a figure who celebrates being the outsider, something that we can all relate to on some level. When she speaks you can’t help but listen. Her strong attitude is empowering and this is why she is a cult figure for many different types of people. And even though the ending did feel a little abrupt, Cho is a pro at this.

Reviews by Coco Creme

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The Blurb

Revered for crass, taboo busting material, Cho is back with new stand-up and songs from her 2011 Grammy nominated album. 'One of the funniest comedians in America' (New York Times). Book early!

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