Magnets

The all-male professional a cappella group return to the Fringe for another sell-out run in Udderbelly’s biggest venue, and they do it in true boyband style, complete with fantastic lighting, an enormous venue with banging rock music and a smoke machine for good measure. Totally different from the other a cappella groups, these guys are professional and know it, making a massive, microphoned, synthetic sound to completely overwhelm. Welcome to the return of the manband.The soloists were spectacular, with charisma that completely pulled in the audience, backed by spectacular beatbox and bass which gave the pieces a driving momentum that was accomplished amazingly with only voices. And as for that beatbox: I’ve watched a lot of a cappella, but goodness, the things that man can do with his lips! The five minute interlude whereby he dismissed the singers from stage and laid down beat, doubled beat and tune of Seven Nation Army was jaw-droppingly awesome. However, the beatbox did sometimes impede the actual voices and the non-soloists in certain pieces became more backing dancers than a cappella harmonisers. Interludes into barbershop or almost Gibbons-esque six-part harmony were very welcome and I would have liked to hear more of this. It often felt that the group were too cautious with sustained harmonies in most of the pieces, relying too much on the beatbox drive.After a fantastically driven, charismatic performance, the Magnets received a well deserved standing ovation. Slick, professional and rock and roll, it’s just what they say on the tin: simply great music, made simply with the mouth.

Reviews by Amy Crothers

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The Blurb

'Singing straight from the gods' (Edinburgh Evening News). 'Hats off all round ... breathe fresh air into a cappella ... the world is indeed their oyster' (List). 'Taking a cappella performance to a whole new level' (Herald).

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