Love Story

The Love Story attempts to expose the nature of the individual in our relations with one another and our ability to cope of our own accord. The messages which are conveyed are applicable to all of us, and thankfully offer up no simple answer to the human character.The start of the play was a simple love story in which the male role, an extroverted juvenile character with a love for words, manages to endear himself to a frontline psychologist until they progressively fall for each other. However this play attempts to justify the manic vicissitude of human interaction using many of the infinite reasonings that psychology grants us. An example of one of the central messages the play conveyed is that our words and actions with one another are ultimately a hollow condition formed by human experiences, all aimed only to portray the emotions we need to survive as animals but providing our lives with complications and misinterpretations. The script gives the audience an encompassing idea to guide them through the hazardous jungle that can be created when a play touches on many difficult concepts at the same time. Ideas need time to be pondered upon, and this can never be granted to an audience member who is considering the plot and is provided with very little else to guide them through the complex issues. While this problem fundamentally ruins many similar plays, this one succeeded in being quite understandable.Ultimately we are led to realise that, despite the use of many different styles of speech from analytical to natural, despite the character features and flaws, the only constant image that is portrayed is human raw emotion. And this is how the play looks towards being ‘The’ love story, one that is exemplary of all other stories of human love in differing circumstances. The effects that were indicated in the script were largely achieved, however for a script that relied so heavily on the strong and committed characterisation of the roles there was more to be desired of the actors. This may be forgiven as a case of the first-performance nerves and, as it did through the show, I feel that the acting will improve to reveal a lot more of the script’s potential.

Reviews by Theo Barnes

Rain

★★★★★

The Forum

★★★

Fire and the Rose

★★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

The Blurb

'You can't love someone you don't understand.' Passion, illness, forgiveness from '8 Out of 10 Cats' and 'Never Mind the Buzzcocks' writer, RSC Other prize winner Freddy Syborn: 'Touches upon greatness - triumph' (Scotsman).

Most Popular See More

Everybody's Talking About Jamie

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Tina - The Tina Turner Musical

From £13.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Matilda the Musical

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

From £13.00

More Info

Find Tickets

SIX

From £29.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets