Love in the Time of Gilmore Girls

Sometimes love comes to you and sometimes you have to make it happen. Or so James (Thomas Wingfield) thinks. In this funny and cringeworthy hour, he takes us on a tour of all his romantic failings.

Jake Westow Miller’s script is tightly written, filled with ridiculous scenarios made believable by the fully fleshed-out character of James.

We begin with Mia, the girl he bakes a thousand cakes for, yet could not persuade that he was the Troy Bolton to her Gabriella Montez. He is a loser, but this makes him all the more likeable. He is frustrating and embarrassing but we sympathise with his incredibly naive plight. He has good intentions - but still has a lot to learn about love.

Jake Westow Miller’s script is tightly written, filled with ridiculous scenarios made believable by the fully fleshed-out character of James. Though the storyline is nothing new - boy searches for love - Westow Miller has made this telling fresh and funny with oodles of wit and well-timed contemporary references, particularly to his beloved TV programmes.

It is unfortunate that the end the play takes a disappointing twist. It becomes too sentimental for its own good and this seriously undermines all the good work that has come beforehand. Though I love an uplifting ending, this one unfortunately ends up pretty awkward and just shows that James has learnt nothing about love at all. 

Reviews by Marni Appleton

Underbelly, Cowgate

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Family

★★★★
Just the Tonic at The Mash House

Love in the Time of Gilmore Girls

★★★
Underbelly, Cowgate

Penny Arcade: Longing Lasts Longer

★★
Pleasance Courtyard

Cornermen

★★★★
Chiquito

Burning Books

★★★★★

Performances

Location

The Blurb

Minimum wage job, no girlfriend - how, James wondered, had it come to this? Maybe it was something to do with the three women with whom he’d had intense, unrequited, one-sided affairs? Maybe if he hadn't spent so much time watching Gilmore Girls? Maybe it was all David Cameron's fault? Jake Westow Miller’s new play is a comedy about relationships, coming of age in Cameron's Britain, and a man who discovers that his one true love might just turn out to be television.