Lou Conran: I Love Lou C

Conran’s conversational stand-up tells the story of her biological clock. Told she wouldn't conceive, she accidentally gets pregnant, but then tragically suffers a miscarriage. Intermingling anecdotes about her paper thin walls, her gentleman callers, her sex-starved friends and her inarticulate family, Conran’s hour is funny and bittersweet. Perfect for audiences wanting a friendly and frank lunchtime show.

Conran proves herself a natural and unaffected storyteller, and it's a tale worth telling.

Conran cheerily meets and greets us as we enter, setting up an informal atmosphere: a man in the front row has even brought a half-finished pizza in with him (and becomes known as plain Margarita). Conran maintains this comradely mood for the duration of her performance. The first half of the show is mostly recounting Conran’s sex stories - it feels like you're listening to an old friend get tipsy in the pub.

Certainly not for the prudish or squirmish, Conran delights in escalating stories about industrial dildos, missing earplugs, and the problems of living alone with her imaginary husband Jeff. By the time Conran tells us about her traumatic experiences with losing her daughter, we have warmed so entirely to her that we are all on tenterhooks. By the end I feel like the shop assistant Conran describes, who started crying after helping her pick waterproof mascara to wear at her daughter's funeral.

Conran apparently Googled ‘How do you end a show which has been a bit grim?’, but there weren't any answers. There are no real endings, she tells us, just where the story ends. For her hour Conran proves herself a natural and unaffected storyteller, and it's a tale worth telling. With all this, and proceeds going to an important cause, there's every reason to go and love Lou C’s show.

Reviews by Lily Lindon

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Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
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Performances

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The Blurb

(I'm in my dressing gown, eating boiled eggs, bear with…) Right, imagine visiting your favourite friend/aunty/spinster/woman of independent means. She's a touch eccentric and always "alright". Until last year, when it wasn’t alright and it all went a bit wrong. With lessons learned, a bit of self-discovery and some painful yet funny situations, this is a story about life and, ultimately, death. But in a positive, uplifting sort of way. ‘Naturally funny’ (Sarah Millican). ‘Masterful at owning a room’ (FringeReview.co.uk). As seen on BBC, ITV & Channel 4.

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