LOL (Lots of Love)

The six-strong cast of Luca Silvestrini’s Protein Dance vividly captures the extremes of excitement and loneliness associated with mobile communication and online social media in this high-energy dance theatre work that dissects and examines the nature of our obsession with the world of the virtual network, and questions its alarming replacement of human interaction. Silvestrini lists several definitions of LOL, ‘laughing out loud’, ‘lack of love’ and ‘losers on line’ amongst others, each of which pops up in this piece.A strong, diverse cast speak in the clunky, abbreviated language of text and instant messaging whilst they dance both abstract and narrative choreography. The ensemble effectively creates, by turns, the chaos of multiple simultaneous electronic communications and the solitude of online life, equipped with only an empty stage and a colourful bundle of wires. Updates, pokes, new friendships and groups are articulated through physical gesture as we meet an array of characters from lonely hearts desperately seeking cyber romance to online shopping addicts. All unfolds to an upbeat soundtrack by Andy Pink, punctuated by the familiar sounds of message alerts and keyboard tapping.LOL is a witty and timely creation, and holds appeal for both the self-confessed internet addict and the social media sceptic. The piece makes a bold attempt at uncovering the underlying issues of our society’s growing reliance on virtual relationships and electronic communication and, although it’s essentially a fairly shallow exploration, there are some touching moments in which the vulnerability of the characters is revealed.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

The Blurb

Talking and dancing at speed, Protein's dancers nail the language of life online in this timely, razor-sharp look at how we're rewiring romance. 'Exhilarating and funny' **** (Guardian), **** (Times), 'Right on the zeitgeist' (Metro).

Most Popular See More

Wicked

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Mousetrap

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Phantom of the Opera

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Lion King

From £35.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £15.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Book of Mormon

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets