Little Shop of Horrors

The 80s was time of many things; Rubic's Cubes, cheesy pop... rock and roll singing plants. Fife Youth Arts presents a short run of the iconic 80s musical Little Shop of Horrors. The children aged between 12 and 15 take on this horrifically fun classic with all the do-whap and enthusiasm you would expect.

Come along, sit down, laugh, reminisce, stay at home if you like. But whatever you do – don’t feed the plants.

Seymour works in a florist in downbeat skid row, sweeping floors and serving customers (if any ever came). The shop looks set to close until one day he comes across a rare and unusual plant which brings the little shop to the centre of public attention. The plant, sweetly named Audrey Two after his romantic interest, will not grow. Seymour discover that the plant, along with his fame and fortune need something more than water to survive.

The company brings the spirit of fun that goes hand in hand with this show opening with a lively rendition of the titular song. The kids’ voices carried through the audience with strength and a New York R&B twang. The fun brought forward by both the performers and the music was let down slightly by the monochrome design choices is set and costume. Although a nice contrast was brought about in the second act when more colour was added to the stage though the ever growing Audrey Two.

The clear highlight of the show was the individual performances of the young actors. Blair Hollingworth starred as the lead character Seymour, with a beautifully sweet voice and an instantly endearing stage presence. He is a very reliable performer and carried the heavy weight of the part with ease and confidence. Orin Scrivello the Dentist provides dark comic value to the production, effortlessly delivered by David Scott, mastering a demented giggle he formed an instant rapport with the audience whilst remaining true to the sinister sadistic nature of his character. However Lois Hardie stole the show in the role of Audrey. Lois possess what would be an incredible voice even own a grown woman, but at her age the results are breath-taking. The character brings a sweet innocence to the production delivered perfectly by the young star. These children bring a magnificent sparkle to an already dazzling show with a phenomenal reputation. So come along, sit down, laugh, reminisce, stay at home if you like. But whatever you do – don’t feed the plants. 

Reviews by Gillian Bain

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Performances

Location

The Blurb

A down and out skid row floral assistant becomes an overnight sensation when he discovers an exotic plant with a mysterious craving for fresh blood. Soon Audrey grows into an ill-tempered, foul-mouthed, R'n'B singing carnivore who offers him fame and fortune in exchange for feeding its growing appetite, finally revealing itself to be an alien creature poised for global domination.