Lights! Camera! Improvise!

What do you get when you combine sci-fi with time travel with the Vatican City and the movie title “Bad Popes Gone Wild”? The answer – a hilarious improvised movie containing a blurry burlesque dance sequence , gap years to Thailand and an insane final plot twist that somehow actually seemed to make a lot of sense.

If you like movies, go and see this show. If you don’t like movies, go and see this show anyway and get the chance to have your ideal movie play out before your eyes. The way improv theatre works is that the host, here aptly named Oscar, asks the audience for certain snippets of information to form a bare-bones idea for a movie – in this case, genre, theme, setting and title. Then, the host takes a more passive role and watches the action play out in front of him, occasionally ‘pausing’ the action to make comments or steer it in a certain direction. This is obviously a technique used to allow the actors to frantically rack their brains for the next plot device, but ‘Oscar’ is engaging and full of energy, and has ideas of his own as to how the action should play out.

The plot itself revolved around three separate timelines, a premise which was maintained almost perfectly, which was highly impressive given the often complicated and confusing aspects to time travel. The story was engaging and side-splitting, and the audience (and possibly the actors too) were left wondering how exactly it was going to end. Highlights included the ‘Director’s Cut’ snippets of the Writer’s Room, where a lazy production team proceeded to make poor, snap decisions, at which point the director would shout: “Perfect, let’s go to the pub!”; a play on how certain characters are always overlooked and are restricted to merely repeated or confirming a previous character’s dialogue; and the final plot twist which involved the time travelling Popes killing Judas, and therefore causing Jesus’ betrayal to never happen, and Jesus was thus never crucified – and as a result, the Catholic faith crumbled, a fact that was eerily predicted by a prophetic cardinal earlier in the story.

The cast were remarkable in their enacting of the story and managed to hold together a premise that could have been very easy to get very wrong. The result was a hysterical performance that was enjoyed by every last spectator. Go see this show – you won’t regret it.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

The Blurb

The award-winning improvised movie, live on stage. You choose the genre, location, title - we improvise the film. Sell-out 2009-2011. ***** (Edinburgh Reporter). ***** (BroadwayBaby.com). ***** (BroadwayWorld.com). ***** (TheNewCurrent.com). **** (List). **** (ThreeWeeks).

Most Popular See More

Dear Evan Hansen

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Hairspray

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Matilda the Musical

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Phantom of the Opera

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets