Ladies of the Sacred Heart

Not another comedy about nuns! I cried, being one of those people who don’t find nuns intrinsically amusing, but I must confess I found it difficult to suppress a giggle when the lights went up and I saw the icon of Ronan Keating placed so reverently amongst the candles centre-stage. I was won over immediately with the warmth and sensitivity of the opening sequence which interwove stories of nun existence with their morning prayers, passing thoughts from nun to nun with Ericksonian word-snatching and well-rehearsed grace.Unfortunately there is little to praise in the remaining hour of the show. While all three performers are potentially fine comic actresses, the script was simply too tired to be funny and the mysteriously-undefinable plot left confusion rather than hilarity in its wake. The Ronan icon was ruined by its use in a trite joke (and wasn’t there something similar in the Vicar of Dibley?) and with the first glimpse of a pink translucent vibrator the audience's hopes of an original or funny show curl up for the winter.The frigid (and mysteriously English) Sister Mary the Superior is played by a particularly brave and consistent actress, while Maud the Guinness-swilling horny one with her pronunciation of the Bible as bib-lea got the loudest laughs from the audience. The three actresses dealt well-enough with their characters for one to wonder why they had agreed to be in the production, whose overall effect is one of a sort of female-led best man’s speech without the wedding or the free champagne to justify its existence.

Reviews by James T. Harding

Pleasance Courtyard

Creatives

★★
Bedlam Theatre

The Duck Pond

★★★★★

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The Blurb

An original comedy sketch following three absurd nuns. With a Guinness at hand, a picture of Ronan Keating by the crucifix and an innocent mistake with a vibrator... this is certainly not for the faint-hearted!

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