Knock Knock

‘Some names and identifying details have been changed to protect the innocent’ reads a screen at the back of the stage. Damian Kingsley’s Knock Knock is an unravelling of his identity: from his school years to his relationship with his father, all leading towards his recent separation from his partner, after which, he ‘didn’t have a pot to piss in.’ It’s a somber theme, and Kingsley doesn’t shy away from this, choosing to find comedy in the small details of each story.

Kingsley's sarcastic and jesting personality make him a pleasure to spend an hour with.

The set begins with a short black and white film montage of expensive jewellry shops, presumably to ease us into some of the themes of the show: pretentiousness and money. Unfortunately poor sound quality makes the voiceovers unintelligible, and it never becomes entirely clear what the film adds to the show.

Once Damian Kingsley begins talking, however, the mood picks up. He is hilarious in his mocking exchanges with members of the audience, brazenly quizzing two audience members on personal details of their relationship - ‘have you tried roleplay?’ ‘All the time’ is the forthcoming response.

His material does take some time to warm up, at moments forsaking the comedy for the autobiographical. The beginning of the set particularly feels more like the beginning of a motivational speech, in the before stage of success. However, he is an excellent storyteller, and he soon settles the audience into his social style of comedy.

The set is a mishmash of anecdotes: some of his own and some of his dad’s, constantly looking back to make some sense of where he has ended up. None of his material is outstanding, and punchlines are a bit scattered, but his easy manner injects comedy into so much of what he says that laughter flows freely.

Kingsley's sarcastic and jesting personality make him a pleasure to spend an hour with. He’s a wonderful storyteller with an easy manner and a great sense of humour. This show comes recommended as a low-key, entertaining way to spend an afternoon.

Reviews by Ellie Coote

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★★★★
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★★★

Since you’re here…

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Performances

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The Blurb

A story about identity and pretentiousness for anyone with a friend or partner who's become a bit of prick. All donations go to Shelter as part of the penniless tour from Lands’ End. No admission after start.

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