Kill the Beast: Director's Cut

Acclaimed comedy troupe Kill the Beast returns to the Fringe with a new show that is a bizarre mash up of Poltergeist and The Room. The performance is at times hysterical, even if it isn’t always able to hit the mark.

An enjoyable enough romp through 70’s nostalgia

Director’s Cut focuses on the troubled production of a 1970’s satanic exploitation film, where the untimely death of the star actress calls for last minute reshoots. As the hapless director tries to wrangle melodramatic actors, misbehaving props and a less than ideal replacement for the deceased star, strange supernatural forces conspire to make things a whole lot worse for everyone involved.

From the outset, the troupe showcase the madcap sense of physicality and comedic timing that has made Kill the Beast such a well regarded comedy company. Every performer is pitch perfect in their roles, embodying the doddering buffoonery of prima donna stage actors or put-upon tortured directors, with suitably exaggerated poise and melodrama. This constant heightened energy keeps the play's forward momentum from being lost in the many costumes changes signalling the multiple characters played, each with their own distinctive neuroses and odd mannerisms. Additionally, the play's breakneck pace is paired with a steady stream of gags. With scarcely a moment going by without an attempt to have the audience in stitches, they build jokes onto jokes to establish brilliant setups and payoffs.

It is, however, unfortunate that despite these many positives, the show is never completely able to reach its full potential. The show's exaggerated tone and melodramatic sense of comedy can, at times, work against it. The over the top vocalizations and shouting on stage meant punch lines and gags were at times rendered inaudible and were lost in the din.

Additionally, the show is never able to weave the horror elements and themes into the production in a way that feels organic. Attempts to unnerve the audience never go far enough to elicit any semblance of fear; rather they distract from the comedy and muddy the tone of the production. In a self-described horror comedy, it is these moments where the unnerving meets the hilarious that should be the highlights of the production. Yet here they feel like add ons to a farce that would have better without them.

Ultimately, Kill The Beast’s new offering is a funny and engaging hour of comedy that, whilst not able to live up entirely to its premise, is still an enjoyable enough romp through 70’s nostalgia and good old fashioned theatrical farce.

Reviews by Joseph McAulay

Pleasance Courtyard

Great British Mysteries: 1599?

★★★★
Pleasance Courtyard

Kill the Beast: Director's Cut

★★★
Pleasance Courtyard

No Kids

★★★★
Pleasance Courtyard

Dietrich: Natural Duty

★★★★
Summerhall

DollyWould

★★★★
Traverse Theatre

Ulster American

★★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

Welcome to the worst film never made. Thankfully there's only one scene left to shoot. As heard on BBC Radio 3, critically acclaimed comedy troupe Kill the Beast return with a new tale of haunted Hollywood hilarity: Singin' in the Rain meets The Exorcist, Carrie meets Noises Off. The fires have been contained, the wigs have been sterilised, and the star has been replaced after the accident. Surely, nothing else can be waiting in the dark? Praise for Kill the Beast: Edinburgh Stage Award 2016 winners. 'Electric genius' (Stage). 'Masters of comedy horror' (Time Out).

Most Popular See More

The Phantom of the Opera

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Mousetrap

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Back to the Future - The Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Come From Away

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Dear Evan Hansen

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Cinderella The Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets