Keep the Kids Out!

A rare treat of the Fringe is being able to speak your mind in a venue without having the talent shout you down. The Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas offers just such an opportunity every afternoon in St Andrews Square, with a series of discussions around diverse and wildly divergent topics. From bilingualism to Big Data, experts, researchers and decision-makers encourage us to debate and to discuss, to offer our own opinions and to challenge theirs. The whole run is sponsored and organised by the Beltane Network, which aims to make academic research available to a wider audience, and works with all four of Edinburgh's universities. This all means that there is a real danger of the show becoming more like a lecture, so the addition of the ever-vibrant Susan Morrisson is a stroke of genius, bringing us back down to earth and making us think about how the issues at hand affect us personally.

With a different talk every day of the Fringe, there is sure to be at least one event which pricks up your ears

Today, our musings were around the subject of how children experience public space. Why are all our beautiful green spaces surrounded by impenetrable fences? Why are all our schools surrounded by roads? Why does Edinburgh need only two skate-parks but 67 golf courses? City planners and researchers alike took to the stage to discuss their findings and their own Dangerous Ideas. Throughout, we were asked for opinions and questions, and a lively debate quickly sprung up amongst the audience. Though at times the speakers themselves lost control of this debate a little, Morrisson was always on hand to encourage us along or insist we move on.

As well as its aims to enlighten and entertain, the Cabaret is based around eight themes this year, which range from 'Our Privacy' and 'Our Politics' to the inspiring 'Our Brave new World'. With a different talk every day of the Fringe, there is sure to be at least one event which pricks up your ears or makes you think, and maybe even one or two that make you want to talk about it.

Reviews by Jenni Ajderian

Just The Tonic at the Caves

Afternoon Delight

★★★
Citrus Club

Gower Rangers

★★★
Southsider

An Introduction to Twerking

★★★★
Stand in the Square

Keep the Kids Out!

★★★★
Sweet Grassmarket

The Universal Recipe

★★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
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Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
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Performances

Location

The Blurb

They terrorise our streets, nuisance our neighbourhoods or, worst of all, never leave the house. Are children an environmental threat? Or should we be adapting our environments to suit them? Do urban planners need to discover their inner child? Join us to re-evaluate our urban landscapes and what they say about children. Heading up the discussion is Jenny Wood, a PhD researcher at Heriot-Watt University, and David McAllister, Training and Communications Manager at Planning Aid Scotland. Chaired by Susan Morrison and with your contribution, can we work out how to keep the kids out(side)?

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