Katerina Vrana: Feta With The Queen

Katerina Vrana’s multinational show is the kind of comedy gold that makes the Free Fringe all the more worthwhile. A gigantic-haired Greek living in Britain, Vrana’s hilarious hour long slot is built on differences between the two cultures to much comedic effect.

She admits with great confidence that hers is a show built on stereotypes, but while some comedians might have found it difficult not to err on the side of offensive with this sort of material, Vrana succeeds in poking fun in the most affectionate of manners. Brits, for example, are exquisitely teased for everything from their dependence on tea-drinking and the constant dreary weather, to their passive-aggressive letter writing and love of queues. If you’re a Brit, these may all seem like gags you have heard before, but Vrana is able to place her own spin on humour that could have dried up eons ago and makes it new again. Similarly, her discussion of Greek customs, including tales about leering males, financial generosity and parties of epic proportion, plays on the stereotypes recognisable across the globe, simultaneously making them universally funny but also relatable to the diverse range of ethnicities that the Fringe brings to Edinburgh. For this is where her show really succeeds: she alienates nobody. We are all ridiculous caricatures of our upbringing, but despite our differences, the ability to laugh at ourselves is what brings us all together.

This is her first foray onto the solo circuit, but she clearly has inexhaustible material and an abundance of personality to continue filling rooms for years to come. Definitely one to watch.

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Performances

The Blurb

A show about Katerina's experiences as a Greek in the UK. It covers queues, complaining and the weather. As well as dairy products and delusions of grandeur. 'Katerina Vrana sparkles' (Time Out).

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