Jump

There’s a professional gloss on Tank Production’s new musical, Jump, which should be reason enough to put it on your Festival consideration list. But combine that reason with a healthy collection of witty tunes, solid performances and some of the filthiest one-liners you’re going to hear at the Fringe, and I can see this show is going to be one of those that attract that sought-after marketing nirvana, Festival Buzz. And it’s already happening. Amongst the ‘what-have-you-seen’ conversations I've heard over the last couple of days, Jump is gaining fans.The action opens atop a high rise tower, where it seems our hero, Danny, is going to fling himself off into the traffic below. Before he can do anything rash, he’s joined on the ledge by a hack reporter intent on a salacious story for the local rag. The tale unfolds as Danny attempts to steer the journalist a little closer to the truth.Despite the morbid nature of a suicidal plot, above all this is a comedy. Indeed Kelly Kingham’s script is brimming with unexpected gems that so catch the audience off-guard that the cast have to hold for considerable periods at some points to let the laugher die down. There’s also ingenious subtlety, the sort of thing a second viewing will reveal. There are several clever gags that are still rattling around my head. You’ll know what I mean when you see the show.The characterisations are delectably diverse, and it feels unfair to isolate any of the cast for particular praise as they are universally good – but I did so love Lowri-Ann Richard’s wickedly devious portrayal of Danny’s mother, Ruth and Stuart Saint’s campery as the drag queen Cassie - secret lover of Danny’s father, Maurice. There’s notable musical talent her too. Emma Odell, who breathes such wonderfully comic life into the part of Danny’s girlfriend Niamh has recently appeared as a soloist on the Stephen Sondheim 80th Birthday Prom and Jonathan Dryden Taylor, who does a great job in the role of the reporter here, was on a Pleasance stage last year in the sensational Scott Mills the Musical as Chappers. Completing the cast are Rebecca Hutchinson as Sarah, who transforms from schoolgirl geek to sultry vamp with Cassie’s help, and Danny himself, effortlessly realised by Jonathan Eiø. Musical Director Desmond O’Connor conjures their melodic harmonies admirably – although to be fair, he’s working with pretty good material.If you’ve ever been involved in a production at the Fringe, you’ll know there’s not a lot of time in between shows for set up and strike, and additionally, when sharing a space with six other companies, you don’t get a lot of space to store your set. So you’ll forgive me if I’m still scratching my head wondering how the hell Tank Productions managed to put that scenery up, and where are they putting it afterwards? It’s impossibly ambitious for the Fringe, but I’m so glad they did, as the usual fare of a black box and blocks would dull this piece. Patrick Wilde’s tight direction makes use of its levels and dimensions brilliantly, although I would suggest you get a seat in the front, as I suspect on the very edges of the auditorium there’s so much of the set, that blocking might be an issue.Jump isn’t a world-changing show, but the stellar cast, great direction, ridiculously grand set and laugh-out-loud script make it a must-see this Fringe.

Reviews by Sue Denham

Underbelly, George Square

Myra Dubois: We Wish You a Myra Christmas

★★★★★
Greenwich Theatre

Lizzie

★★★★★
Multiple Venues

La Voix: Red Hot Globe Trot

★★★★★
Leicester Square Theatre

The Adventures of Dick!

★★★★★
Leicester Square Theatre

Dick!

★★★★★
The Assembly Rooms

Worbey and Farrell's House Party

★★★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

The Blurb

In a world obsessed with 'living the dream' can our poor bewildered hero discover what really matters in life? A hilarious new musical about sex, lies, dreams of love - and hoping it's not too late! www.jumpthemusical.com

Most Popular See More

Matilda the Musical

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Phantom of the Opera

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Dear Evan Hansen

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Anything Goes

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets