Journey to X

Abortion and X-Factor may seem unlikely bedfellows, but they’re forced into an unholy union in the poptastic Journey to X. Inspired by Ireland’s draconian abortion laws, the play sees six aspiring starlets journey to London to audition. Deciding to kill two birds with one stone, one of the girls books an abortion in the city where dreams are made and foetuses terminated.

The sextet, clad in black shirts and red ties, squabble as school kids do. Too young to have credit cards, how will they book their flights? Too young to have jobs, how will they even afford their flights? Armed with little more than a wish and a prayer, the group vow to do whatever it takes to reach London - even if it means leaving their morals in a crumpled heap on the floor. Along the way, their progress is hampered by a triumvirate of school bullies, their bad-ass credentials evinced by the jaunty baseball caps and loosened red ties.

‘Fame is a fickle mistress,’ laments the band’s manager as he ponders the path they have chosen. ‘Everyone knows it’s not a singing competition - it’s a popularity contest.’

As the show unfolded, I found myself willing the likable cast to succeed, both in their pop aspirations and theatrical endeavours. Unfortunately it all feels a bit high school musical, from the cartoonish bullies to the scenes that consistently fade to a whimper. Moreover, for a show about pop music, where are the singalong songs? The irresistible hooks? The choreography and body popping? Then again, perhaps that’s the point: X Factor’s not about the music. It never was. Take away the tunes, however, and all you’re left with is broken dreams and unfulfilled potential.

Everyone wants to be famous. No one wants to put the work in.

For all that, the young cast shouldn’t be disappointed: there’s some genuine talent in there and the whole affair is shot through with enthusiasm and good humour, in spite of the bleak subject matter. When X Factor auditions go wrong, the journey doesn’t end there. You pick yourself up, dust yourself down and vow to return a year later. Stronger. Wiser. Better.

Since you’re here…

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You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
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Performances

The Blurb

Some friends have formed a band. Now they have to raise the money to get to London to audition for the world’s biggest talent contest. However, their journey for fame is really for something far less glamorous.

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