Joseph K

Joseph K is a modern day adaptation of Kafka’s The Trial brought to us by students from KGS Theatre Company. Set in 21st century London this piece, written by Tom Basden, follows the life of Joseph K around the time of his 30th birthday. Following a sushi delivery intercepted by two strangers, he is informed of his arrest. This play tells the story of how his life turns upside down in the weeks following this event. His identity is wiped, bank cards and personal records are frozen and there is no-one who can help him clear his name.

A very promising piece from a young company that demonstrates the intellect and talent their generation has to offer.

This play is performed by a large cast of promising male and female student actors, many of whom play a number of different roles. Most of the actors are portraying characters that are older to them and I was very impressed with how believable their performances were. Basden creates a number of comical characters in this piece, my favourites including the cross dressing pair of detectives, the promiscuous intern Lenny, Bear the window glazer and Joseph’s doll-collecting, gluttonous lawyer.

There are many clever and thought-provoking themes in this political satire including power, control and the luxury of freedom. This play mocks bureaucracy and a number of intelligent and humorous sketches are delivered on the use of automated services and unhelpful case workers. Without meaning to sound patronising I was surprised by the sexual content in this piece and how well this young company dealt with some of the more mature themes.

This play could definitely be cut by half an hour and can often rely heavily on stereotypes for comic purposes. However this is a very promising piece from a young company that demonstrates the intellect and talent their generation has to offer.

Reviews by Lynn Rusk

Assembly Roxy

Burnt Out

★★★
The Studio

The End of Eddy

★★★★
King's Theatre

Cold Blood

★★★★★
Pleasance Courtyard

Nina Conti: In Therapy

★★★★★
Assembly George Square Studios

The Stevenson Experience: Identical as Anything

★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

Tom Basden’s darkly comic adaptation of The Trial relocates Kafka's classic novel to 21st-century London. On his 30th birthday, Joseph K has his sushi takeaway intercepted by two strangers who inform him he is under arrest. Unaware of what he has done wrong, he is determined to clear his name. Tapping into the zeitgeist of personal liberty, justice and control, the play ridicules and questions the meaning of freedom in the present political climate.

Most Popular See More

Dear Evan Hansen

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

My Fair Lady

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Moulin Rouge! The Musical

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Grease the Musical

From £20.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mary Poppins

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets