Jokes And Their Relation To The Unconscious

Taken on a whirlwind of what it means to have desires, unconscious and conscious thoughts, Alex Sergeant performed an entertainingly educational stand-up show. Based on the theories of psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud, Freudian expectations were humorously established throughout.

Sergeant’s psychoanalytically-politicised perceptions made for a highly-charged political show at times

Early on in his routine, Sergeant reveals Freud’s belief how sex predominantly governs one’s identity in society. Deploying what he called “Comedic Trick Number One”, Sergeant asked a member of the audience the last time he had sex. Shocking, yes, but the ex-university lecturer’s incredibly open manner garnered a ripple of laughs from the audience. What made it even more amusing was Sergeant’s admission that one should not ask people such sexual questions. These comedic moves endeared the audience to what was to be a simultaneously refined and wacky performance on Freudian theory.

Indeed, Jokes And Their Relation To The Unconscious continued to explain theories of Freud in a whole host of contemporary issues. From the ego to the phallus, the variety of intellectual thoughts conjured up by Sergeant kept the audience entertained throughout. From the more specific examples of the Shard in London to more general ones concerning pub culture, the ego and the phallus were but a couple of theories made amusingly clear. Undeniably, Sergeant’s psychoanalytically-politicised perceptions made for a highly-charged political show at times.

Sergeant’s effortless deployment of tone and timing made it a relentlessly captivating performance. His further inclusions of personal anecdotes were another way to keep the audience interested, so much so that such interest occasionally manifested itself in a friendly shout-out from an audience member. Never flustered by this, Sergeant always professionally responded in an aptly comedic manner. The effort put into this one-man show was evident to see. Creating a warm atmosphere that put everyone at ease, this evening of comedy from Sergeant makes it hard to wait for his next.  

Reviews by Oliver Lugg

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The Blurb

Do you struggle to tell the difference between your ego and your superego? University lecturer turned stand-up comedian, Alex Sergeant, has the answer. Guiding his audiences through some of the more hilarious aspects of the life and work of Sigmund Freud, Alex provides his unique take on a set of ideas that have helped to shape over a century’s work of intellectual thought. Poking fun at the Oedipus complex and avoiding Freudian slips along the way, the show offers an evening's entertainment for the comedy fan who wants to think about why we laugh, whilst laughing and thinking.

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