Jessie Cave: Bookworm

Jessie Cave is a genius. This is true whether we’re talking about her infuriating social recluse of an alter ego or if we’re talking about the actress behind the creation of the exasperatingly geeky Bookworm. The former too clever for her own good, the latter just clever for our own enjoyment. With adorable excitement Cave welcomes us to Bookworms United. During the next fifty minutes we are let in on the reasons behind her obsession with books, the fictional characters she most cherishes and the rules she wishes to impose upon our new club. Not only does the audience expand their vocabulary, but they gain invaluable insight into some of her favourite literature, such as the Barbar series, Narnia and Andre Agassi’s autobiography.

Cave adopts character in such an utterly convincing way and delivers remarkably well-devised monologues, ensuring smiles on faces throughout and some moments of laugh out loud comedy. Her alter ego in fact shares the same life experiences as actress Cave, but when the bookworm takes us through her story it automatically becomes mirthsome. It’s never tedious and the inclusion of a couple of extra characters adds wonderful comedic depth. Her relationship with her younger sister is wickedly portrayed and the pair play out their dominator- dominated relationship with fantastic panache. The extent of Cave’s kooky sense of humour is revealed to us through special gems, notably, her song about The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and a beautifully odd play about unrequited love and her subsequent despondency.

Since you’re here…

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You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
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Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
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Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
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The Blurb

Welcome to Book Club. Twins, beavers, female elephants, sounds, a lion. They all feature heavily. Your host Jessie Cave managed to bamboozle her way into Harry Potter and promises a magical journey via the medium of books.

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