Jessica Fostekew: Moving

The theme of moving house - especially a move that brings you into permanent residence with your partner and an opportunity to learn all their annoying habits - might strike many as a less-than-hilarious experience, rather than one that lends itself to the comedy stage. However, the instantly-likeable Jessica Fostekew’s free show proves to be a well-crafted observational tale that packs plenty of laughter in.

In spite of drawbacks that in some ways typify the fringe - the faulty microphone, constant klaxons going off in the neighbouring venue, a shut bar - Fortescue gains the empathy of an audience for whom many will know the pains of living with a hoarder (her boyfriend owns, among other useless tat, three deflated footballs and two drawers of broken scart cables) and the regular tensions that can exist (‘You didn’t clean out the toastie maker like you said you would, so I think we should break up!’).

Fostekew offers a good mix of describing her own experiences living with her boyfriend for the first time - observing quirks of habit that are magnified in those particular situations such as naming your own car - and utilising props. For example, she reads an unfortunate letter from her neighbours describing how thin bedroom walls don’t bode well for their bedroom antics.

By her own admission, Fortescue has switched to the Free Fringe this year after two successful but hugely expensive years playing the ‘Big Four’ venues. It’s their loss and the Cabaret Voltaire’s gain, as her show is definitely worth paying for. Fortescue’s comedy certainly ‘moves’ in the right direction.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
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Theatre MAD
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Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
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Performances

The Blurb

Jessica’s wonder-filled third show regales with the glorious realities of moving in with a hoarder, out of trouble and up and down the world, but never, ever, over. ‘Great fun’ ( Guardian). ‘Consistently hilarious’ (Fest). www.jessicafostekew.com.

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