Janey Godley Is Ungagged

The mother-daughter duo of Janey Godley and Ashley Storrie kicked off this show with a rather unusual bit of audience interaction. They called out to random members of the audience and pretended to know them. It worked. They disarmed the audience and managed to get them in the mood without them even realising it.

Opening the show for her mum, Storrie proves that the comedy gene can be inherited. Witty and intelligent, she pokes fun at her mum but manages to set herself apart with enough original material.

Godley’s routine itself is more of a comedic discussion than traditional stand-up. Instead Godley reflects on a world gone mad with censorship, where even the smallest comment can be blown out of proportion but actual attacks can pass by almost unnoticed.

In today’s world where the lines between public and private are increasingly blurred it can be hard to determine the impact of what you say. As Godley herself has experienced, off-the-cuff comments can have a greater impact than you ever intended or expected. Social media and specifically twitter have provided ways for people to express their opinions, in a totally faceless manner, no matter how aggressive or violent. Conversely, the law seems to be struggling to keep up with this. Threats of rape, violence and death are made with impunity. Except, as Godley point out, if you’re famous. The disparity between threats against those who are well known and threats made against those without the clout of fame are explored throughout the performance.

The thing about Godley’s show is that, though she is a fantastic comedian, you sometimes feel you shouldn’t be laughing. Godley is fantastic at flirting with the humour in censorship before flipping it round to show how un-funny much of it is. You are left with a knowledge of the ridiculousness of censorship but also the serious aspects that are slipping through the cracks.

Godley ends the show with a sign of solidarity. Reflecting on how unfairly skewed justice by social media is towards the famous, Godley offers her assistance if any of the audience is ever in trouble. She’s famous, she has famous friends and she’s willing to share. I can’t imagine anything better than having this woman on my side in a fight. Though everyone has a right to their opinions, Godley emphasises that everyone has a responsibility to think before they mouth off. In her words ‘Just don’t be a c*nt’.

Reviews by Nicole Adam

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

The Blurb

Glasgow's godmother of comedy is back: ‘most outspoken female stand-up in Britain’ (Daily Telegraph). People have been jailed for being outspoken. Janey's show is about freedom of speech and of thought. Supported by daughter Ashley Storrie.

Most Popular See More

The Book of Mormon

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Phantom of the Opera

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Pretty Woman: The Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Dear Evan Hansen

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Moulin Rouge! The Musical

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets