Jack Whitehall - Nearly Rebellious
  • By Pete Shaw
  • |
  • 10th Aug 2009
  • |
  • ★★★★★

Last week, after a particularly late night out getting my major organs in training for the month that is simply referred to as ‘Edinburgh’, I had my first Festival encounter of Jack Whitehall when he swiped my falafel. Actually, it was a genuine mistake at the counter, but after Jack sheepishly retreated into the night, the irony that his Edinburgh debut show is subtitled ‘Nearly Rebellious’ was not lost on me.Jack is, by his own admission, a bit of a weed who wants to butch up. He wants to be a beer-swilling manly man rather than Smirnoff Ice-sipping toff. He’s had the university education that has given him the façade of a right-on liberal, but he actually thinks he’s turning into his Daily Mail-reading father. And this all gives Jack something of concern.His set is a fast-paced mixture of improvised audience interaction and (at times) tongue-twisting scripted material. He talks about bankers, terrorists, fat kids and religion. He has a self-effacing style that suits him perfectly. And he wants George Lamb to be locked away on trumped-up charges so he can get more work at Channel 4.There’s little not to like about Jack Whitehall. His material is solid, and never fails to hit the funny bone. Even though he says he’s “an unproven comic without enough material to fill an hour”, that concern can clearly now be put aside. His shows are selling out already, and we’re sure to see him as a regular headliner on the circuit. Jack, your father would be proud. And I think we all agree about George Lamb.

Reviews by Pete Shaw

Assembly George Square Studios

The House

★★★★★
theSpace on the Mile

Grace Notes

★★★
Greenwich Theatre

The Jungle Book

★★★
Greenwich Theatre

A Midsummer Night's Dream

★★★★
Multiple Venues

A Spoonful Of Sherman

★★★★★
Pleasance Theatre

Assassins

★★★★

The Blurb

Jack's always wanted to be a real man, like the ones in the audience at 'Top Gear', but unfortunately he likes Smirnoff Ice and doesn't look good with his shirt off. 'Shoo-in for stardom' (Evening Standard).