Interrupt

Set to a mixture of haunting strings and pumping electro rhythms, Collisions Dance bring their premiere performance to the intimate Studio space at Zoo Southside. The modest size of the venue is deliberate, it would seem, as dancers David Beer and Claire Lydon-Strutt weave their show beyond the limits of the traditional stage area to immerse their audience in their intense production.

Their work is split into three sections, signifying confusion, conflict and finally resolution. It starts with the subtlety of traditional ballet, but there is a beat and the mood changes to replace the graceful nature of the initial movement with more contemporary physicality. The proximity of Beer and Lydon-Strutt to the audience is challenging, and heightens the tenor of the room.

As the pair reach the second stage of their performance, they strip to simple black underwear, and again find a new level to take the audience to. It is passionate and speaks of desire and confrontation as they play out this fervent relationship inches away from their spectators.

The show is well served by its roaring soundtrack and atmospheric lighting. Beer and Lydon-Strutt are both very easy on the eye, and whilst there was the occasional wobbly moment, Interrupt is a powerful compliment to Zoo’s strong dance & physical theatre programme this year.

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The Blurb

This folksy story of hope and redemption is an honest account of an outsider with a dark past who changes the lives of people in a small backwoods American town. 'soul satisfying ... work of theatrical resourcefulness' (NYTimes).

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