In Two Minds

Choreographers Chan and Cunningham want to show you their inner dance and say that ‘dance is more than aesthetics’. Unfortunately, this show lacks all aesthetics. I was excited to see the mixture between two great choreographers and expected a powerful combination of dance techniques from the East and West. Instead I felt it was pretentious and pointless. The dancers are probably very good, as is listed in the extensive program handed out at the beginning of the show, they just don’t get to shine.This is a show about schizophrenia and is based on dance movement psychotherapy and the healing power of dance. Although it has the best intentions and a good concept, the result is that you feel like you are watching dance exercises on stage. There is quite a lot of sitting around, for example, when the dancers are copying each other, sticking out their tongues and making childish sounds. It makes me wonder if it is therapeutic for the dancers involved or if it is supposed to benefit the audience. If that is the case, I hope the dancers felt good, because it didn’t reach the audience.The show starts with three performers entering the stage singing/whispering Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star. Somehow this song has become a theme tune for every performance dealing with mental issues, a bit of a cliché. Two more dancers appear and all of them start to perform twitching and robotic movements, without a doubt symbolising how hard it is for some people to make a connection. The concept of feeling alienated and cut off from society is then explored when one dancer loses touch with the others.The second half of the show involves Cunningham sitting on stage performing spoken word along with a video projection of herself, it is far removed from the first half, showing how different her mind is from Chan’s. Repetition is used, Twinkle Twinkle Little Star appears again, and Chan and Cunningham repeatedly ask the question ‘What are you doing?’; I asked myself the same question on the way out.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

The Blurb

Two dance makers from Hong Kong and the UK have created a performance drawn from their extensive personal experience in the fields of dance psychotherapy: witness the healing power of movement and what lies within.

Most Popular See More

Wicked

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Tina - The Tina Turner Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £15.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Moulin Rouge! The Musical

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

SIX

From £21.00

More Info

Find Tickets