How I Invented Hip-Hop... and Other Faux Pas

Mr B is the all-singing, all-rapping chap from Surrey who wants to bring gentlemanly etiquette into hip hop. How I Invented Hip Hop is a series of songs performed by Mr B on a banjolele, his cross between a banjo and a ukulele, accompanied by beats from the likes of Run DMC. As he stepped on to the stage in a tweed waistcoat, with a pipe and a moustache, I knew the evening would get progressively weirder, yet entertaining. Mr B’s repertoire of songs includes numbers such as Let Me Smoke My Pipe, All Hail The Chap and the more controversial song, You Just Can’t Rape A Goat These Days. All of these have various opportunities for audience participation in a call and response type format in which Mr B will play a tune on his banjolele and the audience will respond with All Hail The Chap! Generally, Mr B, a cricketer from Surrey, has everybody smiling with his borderline crazy act. Yet there are moments when, despite his excellent articulation, the lyrics of the raps are too fast and the comedy is lost. The strange lack of narrative, except for a song about the history of hip hop, making the show quite fragmented and its purpose is slightly questionable. Mr B bases his act on a stereotype which is fairly predictable; although it is impossible to deny that I hadn’t predicted the rap about goat rape. This is certainly a show for the open-minded who appreciate a good old fashioned cup of British tea. Mr B fills the Voodoo Rooms with laughter but also a mild feeling of confusion as he expresses his love for hip hop through what can only be described as posh rap.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

The Blurb

The self-styled king of Chap Hop reveals his role in the genesis of rap, acid house and other cultural phenomena in this hilarious solo show. ‘Hip-hop comedy genius’ (Telegraph).

Most Popular See More

Wicked

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Book of Mormon

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Anything Goes

From £42.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Dear Evan Hansen

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Cinderella The Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Tina - The Tina Turner Musical

From £12.00

More Info

Find Tickets