Hitler Alone

There tends to be controversy around plays, and films, that resurrect the character of Hitler for the sake of performance. I must admit I had my own reservations as I bustled up and down Shandwick Place, unable to find the venue, panicking about arriving late to a one-man show about Hitler. When I did arrive (thankfully on time) the performance was utterly brilliant, and I was poignantly reminded not to judge a play by its title.For disclosure, this is not a play that has been designed to generate empathy for the character of Hitler. It is not neo-Nazi sympathising. It is an extraordinary acting achievement by Paul Webster as he gives the audience an insight into a period of history we are all extremely familiar with from the perspective of the loser. Webster recounts many of the key events of Hitler’s life, such as his experience of WWI, the Munich Beer Putch, and the rise of the Nazi party. However, the overall tone of the production is never validating; as a spectator you feel like you are one of Hitler’s secretaries. You experience the ferocious personality of this murderous dictator with his quiet contemplations and heated ravings, his obsession with racial purity, and his dreams of a German empire swelling across the whole of Europe. You are captivated, and more than a little frightened as this person who you thought long-dead comes alive.This is definitely not a play for the faint of heart. You have to appreciate the performance as an art form, and not disregard it merely for its subject matter. Hitler Alone is a fantastic production for its dramatic skill, and historical integrity.

Reviews by Louise Hemfrey

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The Blurb

‘An act of bravery’ **** (Scotsman). The show attempts to penetrate the mind of this ‘maniac of ferocious genius’ (Churchill) who charms and repels as he contemplates his past, present and future in the hour before suicide.

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