Hannah Gadsby - Hannah Wants a Wife

Taking us through a short history lesson in marriage and art through the ages, Hannah Gadsby’s show is stand-up comedy with a little social, cultural and even educational twist. Throughout the show, Gadsby covers many things but the main crux of it is the differences - and indeed similarities - between traditional marriage and gay marriage and what life would have been like for a lesbian in different periods throughout history (the Victorian-era was best, apparently). She uses one of her favourite paintings, Jan Van Eyck’s The Arnolfini Marriage, to illustrate her points about traditional marriage and gender politics, using her light-hearted whimsical humour and insight as an art history graduate.

By far the most entertaining moments of Gadsby’s show are those in which she digresses, which happens a lot. In between her discussion of the many viewpoints and interpretations of the Van Eyck portrait which is so rich with symbolism, Gadsby talks about her dislike for playing gigs in London due to disgruntled stag-do parties who don’t know how they’ve ended up at an Australian woman’s stand-up show. The audience are tickled with laughter at these little extra stories as Gadsby continues, sharing her tale about how having a health assessment essentially declared her as having a dinosaur body (strong legs, pathetically weak arms) and her attempts to be ‘one of the boys’ to stop guys from chatting her up, creating an awkward atmosphere for all parties involved.

Continuing to feed this hilariously and loveably awkward persona she has created for herself, Gadsby reads out some nasty comments she has received from anonymous YouTube dwellers in a section of the show she refers to as ‘No, I Don’t Want To Meet You.’ Before taking her leave, Gadsby takes it upon herself at the end of her show to apologise to all the stereotypes she may have offended during her show, an act which is in itself humorous, of course. She’s quiet, awkward, quirky and doesn’t have to make a big song and dance about her comedy show to get a giggle. Her wistful wit and whimsy is all she needs to have the audience clutching their sides with laughter.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

The Blurb

This is a show about wives. It’s a surprisingly funny show given that dinner won’t cook itself. 'Genuinely superb' (Time Out, Sydney).

Most Popular See More

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £15.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Pretty Woman: The Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

SIX

From £21.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Matilda the Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Phantom of the Opera

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Frozen the Musical

From £36.00

More Info

Find Tickets