Halo Boy and the Village of Death

If you were to somehow strap Tim Burton's Nightmare Before Christmas on the front of an Express Train going in one direction, and Sondheim's Into The Woods on a similar train heading right for it, the resulting aftermath might look an awful lot like Westminster School's new production called Halo Boy.

This is a highly stylised musical feast, which has its origins somewhere in the Book of Revelation, but also in the darkest recesses of Bros. Grimm fantasy. A sinister atmosphere pervades the show through creative lighting, outstanding costume design and a chillingly excellent score - a haunting undercurrent throughout.

Our hero is Renwick, a happy go-lucky sort of character who just happens to have a halo growing out of his neck. He can seemingly do no wrong, but is mistrusted by the god-fearing but spiteful adults of the village. Renwick's ability to perform resurrection is a good deed too far for the hypocritical Pastor Pzarov, and he incites the villagers to hack off Renwick's halo. Banished to the woods, Renwick is bent on revenge. Delving into the depths of their deepest and darkest superstitions, he sets about teaching them a lesson.

The cast of Halo Boy are talented far beyond their years. Their performances would send a jealous shiver through many a professional company. Their drama teacher and Director, Lyndsey Turner, should be immensely proud of them.

Reviews by Sue Denham

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Since you’re here…

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The Blurb

C Main, Adam House. 3-29 Aug (not 14) 2.45pm

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