Good Grief

A Free Fringe double bill of stand-up with no particular theme, Irish comedians Keith Fox and Ger Staunton underwhelm with their unassuming stage presence and only mildly amusing humour.

Both stand-ups deliver a sometimes pleasantly relaxed set, but both failed to really get their audience going.

First up was Keith Fox, who mostly only inspired the occasional chuckle. The jokes range from mildly amusing anecdotes to unoriginal observations, such as the contradiction between widespread opposition to immigration and our colonial past, which although clearly true doesn’t take a stand-up comedian to point out. The slightly odd tone of some of the anecdotes often raised a smile, but his delivery often felt flat, and when he did try to drolly emphasise his punchlines it felt a little bit forced and the joke itself came as an anti-climax. The running joke of his set was the emptiness of the oft repeated advice to be yourself when some people’s ‘true selves’ are fairly horrible, which is hardly original ground for the misanthropic subset of comics. Still, there was nothing objectionable about the set; there just could have been a touch more charisma and sharper humour.

Ger Staunton took to the stage for the second half of the show, and was a very similar comic to Fox. Again he didn’t have much of a comic persona, and spoke in something of a monotone. His material was less unified than Fox’s and mostly consisted of unconnected anecdotes, aside for some satisfying links back to earlier material near the end of the set. The material often covered tired ground like some of Fox’s gags: a surreal routine about political correctness didn’t feel particularly fresh despite Staunton’s best efforts, but some gags about drunkenness were surprisingly funny.

Considering it’s a free show it’s not an unpleasant experience, but saying this the Free Fringe features a lot of better and more inventive comics. Both stand-ups deliver a sometimes pleasantly relaxed set, but both failed to really get their audience going.

Reviews by Simon Fearn

Paradise in The Vault

Hyena

★★★★
theSpace @ Surgeons Hall

Bull

★★★
theSpace @ Jury's Inn

Broken Fanny

★★★★
Quaker Meeting House

Five Kinds of Silence

★★★★
SpaceTriplex

About a Girl

★★★
theSpace @ Jury's Inn

Procrastinate

★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

Stand-up comedy from Irish comedians Keith Fox and Ger Staunton. In a world where grief and misery seem omnipresent, Good Grief tries to deal with the struggles and expectations of modern living. The pair look inside and out in an effort to make grief good, or at the least… funny. ‘Incredibly funny’ (Irish Examiner). Vodafone Comedy Carnival 2015, Electric Picnic, Edinburgh and Galway Fringes 2015.

Most Popular See More

Mamma Mia!

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Pretty Woman: The Musical

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets

SIX

From £29.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Lion King

From £45.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Matilda the Musical

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Heathers The Musical

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets