Girl from Nowhere

Filtered through the consciousness of the bright eyed and burnt out Jeannie, Victoria Rigby’s new play explores all that was best and worst about the sixties. Appearing as just another rock chick, with records scattered about and a battered acoustic guitar, Jeannie soon takes us down through a world of egomania, violence and beautiful music.

The play is strong and engaging

Jeannie (played by Rigby herself) is a free spirit who emerges from the unpromising town of Coyote Creek in West Texas. Her abiding passion for music forces her to break out so she can forge a career as a rock star, with all its many pitfalls. Rigby’s performance is layered and heartfelt. She moves from scene to scene with an effortless sincerity that makes her oddly vulnerable and admirable at the same time. Her singing voice accentuates this, brilliantly treading the line between innocence and sultriness. One would need a heart of stone to avoid welling up at her rendition of the Stones’ No Expectations. Rigby should also be praised for the tact with which she deals with her heroine’s tragedy and the authentic feminist anger her play manages to summon on the way towards its chilling denouement.

The show is not without its share of problems. The script relies on one too many convenient coincidences to get from A to B (‘this guy I just bumped into in the desert has an opening in his band’) and certain scenes drag, rather than bounce, along. The lengthy introduction of the angelic Chet is wearying and not altogether believable in the light of later revelations.

For the most part though the play is strong and engaging, as Jeannie becomes both a hero and a victim of her times. 

Reviews by Rory Mackenzie

Pleasance Dome

Unmythable

★★★★
Pleasance Courtyard

Girl from Nowhere

★★★★
Gilded Balloon

Allie

★★★
Pleasance Courtyard

Boris: World King

★★★★★
C venues - C nova

Some Thing New

★★
Pleasance Courtyard

A+E

★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

Texas, 1969. The country is bursting with vibes of peace, love and rock 'n' roll, but, disgraced hell-raising rock singer Jeannie is dragged back to the oppressive small-town values of a home she's outgrown and desperate to escape. But she has a confession to make first. This breathtaking new play stares straight at the collateral damage of a life led in search of a legacy, allowing us an extraordinarily intimate glimpse behind closed doors as Jeannie fights for her last chance at immortality before it slips away. **** (Everything-Theatre.co.uk).

Most Popular See More

Matilda the Musical

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Tina - The Tina Turner Musical

From £13.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mary Poppins

From £31.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Lion King

From £36.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Witness for the Prosecution

From £19.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets