George In The Dragon's Den

George in the Dragon’s Den is an odd mix of child and adult humour; a two hander, it markets itself as “a topical tour de force where pantomime meets Monty Python”, however despite an energetic attempt, it never really manages to convince in either department. In essence, “Las Productions” have re-invented the story of St. George and the dragon as a business like pitch, in part mirroring the BBC’s successful show “Dragon’s Den”. However, instead of having to trade blows with Theo Paphitis, Deborah Meaden and Duncan Bannatyne, George is up against a real dragon, who is more interested in multiplying food than money. To be fair to the performers they do commit themselves whole heartedly to the physical comedy – I was slightly perplexed at first when, as one of an audience of just two, a workman dressed in a boiler suit walked through the door onto the side of the stage and started pointing at me as if there was something amiss. In fact, I was almost on the point of going over to him and explaining that there was a performance taking place when, much to my amusement, I realised that he was actually our reluctant hero, George. However, despite moments such as these there is an undenying feeling that this piece has been written for the wrong audience. Clearly, “George in the Dragon’s Den” is a children’s show and both the slapstick nature of it, along with the amusing rhymes (much of the text is written in verse) is likely to prompt laughter from the under 10s, however the decision to make the background of “Dragon’s Den” so prevalent is baffling. Yes, it might register with some of the adults accompanying their children and it is, in a sense, a clever idea for a re-invention of the story, but one that would be more suited to a satirical sketch rather than an hour long children’s show. I like the invention behind their presentation, but unfortunately they are pitching the wrong material to the wrong people, and as a result “I’m out”!

Reviews by John C Kennedy

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

The Blurb

Witty physical theatre as two actors dare to turn the famous story of St George into a topical tour de force where pantomime meets Monty Python. Tongue-in-cheek for the brave and the meek.

Most Popular See More

Matilda the Musical

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Lion King

From £36.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Dear Evan Hansen

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mary Poppins

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Phantom of the Opera

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets