Funny Stuff for Happy People

Wearing a kilt, a red stripy top and a pair of gold earrings, the bearded Martin ‘Bigpig’ Mor somehow made me think of a Scottish pirate in a children’s storybook. In a way, it is hard to describe this show, which relies so much on the cartoonish like personality of Mor, but it is perhaps best summed up by describing it as a series of simple tricks which require much audience participation. Mor invited a succession of volunteers, old and young, on stage to help him with his acts of juggling, balancing or spinning. Somehow he managed to make something like spinning a ball on his finger or juggling with three balls into spectacles, all through the talent of his showmanship.

There was very much a touch of street performer about the whole show, seen in the way he hooked in his audience and the rapport that he had with various audience members. His first act was to improve on his introduction, getting the audience to cheer and release party-poppers and balloons, while one poor dad had the task of introducing Mor through the medium of rap. This ten minute performance certainly managed to get the crowd involved and excited but he soon channeled this enthusiasm in getting them to sit calmly and watch the show. However, it does feel an oddly disproportionate time to spend on an introduction, especially considering that the entire show lasted no longer than 35 minutes. The show definitely could have afforded to be a little bit longer; it feels like he had just worked up the crowd into the right mood when suddenly he stopped. Despite its brevity though, this man and his beard makes for a charismatic and engaging show.

Since you’re here…

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You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
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Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
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Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
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Performances

The Blurb

A show for all the family. Comedy, storytelling, magic, and some stupid science. Martin has been performing his shows all over the world for almost 30 years. Martin ‘Bigpig’ Mor is very funny.

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