Five Women Wearing the Same Dress

We are in the American Deep South. The five women are bridesmaids wearing identical dresses of an apricot hue, heartily disliked by the women inside them. They suggest at one point that the bride only insisted on the design and colour so that she could look good alongside them. They vary in age and experience – between 21 and 35, and between a very naive committed Christian and a woman of, shall we say, very wide experience. There is also a lesbian and the rebellious younger sister of the bride. These different characters are allowed to develop, leading to entertaining discussion and much humour. It feels like delicious eavesdropping. They gossip about the bride, the groom, men (including a couple of rakes known to them), the dangers of sex and relationships, and what they do and don’t want. When a man eventually appears, it is something of a catalyst.These are thoroughly modern southern women, open in their discussion of their private lives and with a very contemporary honesty. I hope I haven’t made it seem too dry or stereotypical because it is neither of these things. It deals with how modern western women navigate their lives and it does so with a great deal of humour – there are some great comic lines – and with compassionate insight.If you still have a 10pm free this Fringe, I would heartily recommend this show.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
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Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
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The Blurb

Alan Ball's bittersweet comedy follows five bridesmaids in Tennessee as they avoid a bride they can't stand. Join them as they dish about sex, love, marriage and what it means to be a woman.

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