Figs in Wigs

Figs in Wigs sells itself as ‘an abstract piece of theatre reflecting facetiously on the absurdity of modern-day living’. Abstract is an apt word, as I’m not entirely sure of what the show’s storyline is, or if it has one. We start with a woman on stage: green wig, pink dress, oddly shaped bag. More women appear, in red wigs and there is a scene set in a speed dating session. Most of the story is told through the medium of dance, as in the speed dating scene, where men (thankfully without wigs) appear to dance with the chairs to delightful French pop. In a show with so much dancing, the music becomes a central element and all the tracks in this show are well chosen and enjoyable to listen to, enhancing the facetious atmosphere of the piece. Unfortunately, none of the cast are innate dancers and the choreography, though it can be interesting at times, often lacks imagination.One of the best moments is when the men and women act out a series of encounters between the sexes to the voice over of a kissing-coach from the 1950s. These moments are touching and comical but feel disjointed from the rest of the play. Most of the play, in fact, feels like a series of disjointed sketches on the subject of love and finding ‘the one’, while the continued use of the woman in the green wig (Rachel Gammon) suggests a storyline, leaving us searching desperately for something that just isn’t there. Between different dances (the electric-kiss dance is particularly good), saxophone solos (Oli Roy provides some fun jazz riffs), swimming routines and reading cryptic love notes, a cake on a trolley is wheeled around the stage. This happens so often that it begins to take on a greater significance, finally culminating when Gammon eats the entire thing on stage as the rest of the cast perform a bizarre dance around her dressed in flowery swimming caps.That the cast switches characters every night explains some of the lack of characterisation, and indeed confusion. They do this, I am told, for two reasons. Firstly, this is the story of how the search for a ‘one true love’ becomes narrower and narrower and everyone must have the experience at some point. The other reason is that it’s not physically possible for one person to eat an entire dark forest gateau every night.

Reviews by Louisa-Claire Dunnigan

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The Blurb

Ten young, well-dressed actors with GSOH seek like-minded companions for brief relationship (45 minutes max). Likes physical exertion/late night baking. WLTM 89 (M or F) N/S bums to fill empty seats. Chekhov lookalikes strongly encouraged.

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