Enterprise

Americana Ad Absurdum Productions certainly lives up to its name by combining America’s most-loved export, free-market capitalism, with some surreal and absurdist humour. Imagine Glengarry Glen Ross written by Eugene Ionesco and you’ve got an idea of the kind of rapid-fire dialogue that ends up folding in on itself, weighed down by the characters’ reliance on finance jargon that doesn’t mean anything in the real world let alone the world of the play.

It’s OK to care about other people but everything in moderation

Writer Brian Parks paints an evocative portrait of the finance world with the characters’ nonsensical macho bravado, unchecked arrogance and blind worship of money and free-market economics placed centre stage. All of this belies a deep insecurity about the stability, viability and future of not just their careers but their entire ideology and belief in an industry that is spiralling out of anyone’s control. There’s a clear sense that everyone is only looking out for themselves, willing to do anything to get ahead which results in some hilarious one-liners that, worryingly, you could imagine the current President of the United States saying in complete seriousness.

It certainly makes sense to utilise absurdism to try and make sense of this ridiculous reality we currently live in but, given the current state of affairs in the world, much of the satire is rendered either out of date or simply lacking enough bite to actually make an impact. When one character says “It’s OK to care about other people but everything in moderation”, it’s much tamer and more generous than a satire about the business world ought to be. Additionally the overall production is very staccato, with many short scenes interrupted by slightly too long blackouts and many of the punchlines failing to land. Overall Enterprise is an amusing show that ends up presenting a more favourable version of reality rather than effectively satirising the one we live in.

Reviews by Liam Rees

Pleasance Courtyard

Bible John

★★★★★
Underbelly, Cowgate

America Is Hard to See

★★★★★
Underbelly, Cowgate

CONSPIRACY

★★★
Pleasance Courtyard

UNCONDITIONAL

★★★
Pleasance Courtyard

Signals

★★★
Summerhall

Everything Not Saved

★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

With their corporation on the brink of collapse, four panicking businessmen have one desperate night to save their futures. Emergency proposals, email hacking, animal sacrifice – will any of it work? A fast-paced, surreal comedy by Fringe First winner Brian Parks. 'There is no American writer more thoughtful – in an explosive and surreally comic kind of way' (Joyce McMillan, Scotsman). ‘A refreshingly mischievous, inventive author’ (London Times). A Best Off-Off Broadway Show (Time Out, NY). Directed by multi Fringe First winner David Calvitto, 'one of the most admired actors on the Edinburgh Fringe' (Joyce McMillan, Scotsman).

Most Popular See More

The Phantom of the Opera

From £27.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Moulin Rouge! The Musical

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Book of Mormon

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Wicked

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Frozen the Musical

From £36.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Come From Away

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets