Ed Gamble: Stampede

Ed Gamble used to be a fat. It’s a shock to us all, as he addresses his audience with a chiselled charisma. The charisma isn’t new however – it’s Ed Gamble’s 11th Fringe, and you can tell. Not in his face – he moisturises don’t you know – but in his polished delivery.

This is light-hearted humour at its best.

A large chunk of Stampede is about his healthy eating, and what Gamble terms “the cauliflower conspiracy” whereby all carbs are replaced with vegetables. Despite being a topic that bores most, Gamble’s wit manages to extract more out of it than you think: the best of which is him likening the equipment chosen to mash up vegetables to the British class system.

Despite many amusing analogies, as a section it drags on for slightly too long. “You’re wondering if this whole show is about cauliflowers, aren’t you?” Gamble asks knowingly. In truth, the rest of his set raises the bar considerably. As jokes and tangents go from strength to strength, Gamble goes from ‘funny’ to ‘hilarious’.

He tackles the everyday with an uproarious energy. Retelling the conversation he had as his girlfriend attempts to remember the name of the fourth Beatle leaves the audience in stitches. As does his lengthy joke regarding his “Bulldog for men” moisturiser, which then turns into a glorious logistical assessment of how one could moisturise a Bulldog.

While his material regarding the real meanings of “pussy” and “balls” feels slightly unoriginal, Gamble finds uniqueness in his gestures and an invocation of the hashtag #pussysoldiers (see the show to discover the context). What’s more, despite being predominantly observational (a brief impression of Michael McIntyre elicits a roar), his comic analysis of modern-day hypocrisies manages to make a deeper point.

This is light-hearted humour at its best. Gamble has increasingly been on our TV screens and this set proves that he’s bound to be on them a lot more. There’s a cauliflower comedy to come, perhaps. 

Reviews by Sarah Gough

Pleasance Courtyard

Loren O'Brien: Who?

★★★★
Gilded Balloon at the Counting House

Ed Gamble: Stampede

★★★★
Greenside @ Nicolson Square

Alice and the Dream Child

Just the Tonic at The Community Project

Mothers

★★★
The Stand Comedy Club 5 & 6

Lost Voice Guy: Disability for Dunces Volume Two

★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

Gamble thunders into town with a wagonload of misguided opinions and wild conjecture. As seen on Mock the Week (BBC Two), Almost Royal (E4), Drunk History (Comedy Central), Conan (TBS), Russell Howard's Good News (BBC Three), Edinburgh Comedy Fest Live (BBC Three), Man Down (Channel 4) and as heard on the Peacock & Gamble Podcast. 'Gamble's humour darts down unexpected avenues paved with elegant turns of phrase' **** (Scotsman). 'Consistently funny... be there or be square' **** (Time Out). **** (List). **** (Skinny) **** (BroadwayBaby.com) **** (One4Review.co.uk).

Most Popular See More

Mary Poppins

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Wonderment Magic & Illusion

From £15.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

From £18.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Prince of Egypt

From £21.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Lion King

From £36.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Wicked

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets