Durham Revue: Working Title

Death by jazz and neurotic nurses: two of several comedic gems featuring in this year’s offering from Durham’s funny bunch. The talented group of six students present an eclectic mix of sketches and skits – the variety is such that even the grumpiest miser is sure to find something to tickle his fancy, as we bounce bitchy joggers and Basingstoke dating hotlines, between the ‘Cluedo’ mansion and secret cult meetings. The spirited music between the scenes had me bopping along in my chair during the rapid scene changes, but ready to laugh and laugh some more once the action struck up again.What is perhaps particularly commendable about this show is the lack of weak links – all involved were full of enthusiasm and zest, and the energy was kept sky-high throughout, helping us rocket on past some of the perhaps more questionable punch lines. Particular praise must be given to the two female actors, who both delivered some utterly excellent performances replete with bang-on comic timing and a truly commendable variety in their facial and vocal inflexions.The show is topped and tailed by an identical scene, one with a delightfully Brontë-esque twist. Other than this framing of the show, however, the lack of unity in the show could perhaps be a potential flaw: although the comedy-bound audience is of course seeking spice and variety, it is often satisfying to feel a sense of a running theme throughout the performance, to tie the pieces together and create a neat package of comedy. This should not deter any potential viewers, however – the Durham Review are witty, inventive, and full of passion for their genre.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
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Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
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The Blurb

Audience members with keen sense of humour required for light work at the award-winning Durham Revue's latest sketch show. Wit, whimsy and chairs will all be provided. Apply on the door.

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