Drowning Scott

“Would you rather die by drowning or die of cancer?”

This taut drama explores the issues of euthanasia--specifically, assisted suicide. It’s well structured and the performances by all cast members are outstanding.

Scott would rather drown. The 17 year old has terminal cancer and two or three months to live, at best. He won’t make his 18th birthday party. He won’t get to see the new Star Wars movie. He’ll die a virgin. So when Scott and his friends head off on one last hurrah – a camping trip in the Lake District – Scott has a plan. But will he get his way?

This taut drama explores the issues of euthanasia--specifically, assisted suicide. It’s well structured and the performances by all cast members are outstanding.

The characters are well drawn – all of a type, but never stereotyped. Adam Mirskey is emotional and believable as Scott. Dan (Louis Norris) is Scott’s loyal best friend who would do anything for him, except help him die. Joe Prentice is very funny as the dorky Howard, who brings along a portable toilet on their camping trip. Religious Matt (Henry Willis) is mercilessly teased by his friends. Jack (Alex Keane) is not as tough as he pretends. Connor (Tom Morris) is most changed by what unfolds in the play, while Reg (Josh Cobb) injects some much-needed humour into the piece as the party boy bragging about bagging girls.

Running at 45 minutes, the piece is well paced and there are no sagging bits in the script. There are a few sections that would benefit from development to allow the piece to engage more deeply with the subject matter, in particular, emotional responses. The staging was dynamic, and I enjoyed the use of cellophane to suggest water.

Drowning Scott is also remarkable for being completely devised and directed by the performers themselves – all aged about 17. It’s a well-executed piece of theatre that left me incredibly impressed.

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Performances

Location

The Blurb

Twelve days. Ten litres of whiskey. Eight boys. A hut by a lake. One of them has two months to live – but does he want them? Scott Taylor has terminal cancer and his friends have organised one last trip together. Amidst the banter of tipsy adolescents, an impenetrably dark and divisive situation arises when death comes knocking and is invited in. A captivating and blackly comic new play from Triple Fish Theatre. @TF_Theatre

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