Don't Tell Him Pike

Through the 60’s and 70’s BBC television went through a golden period for producing some of the best situation comedy, amongst which was the great Dad’s Army. Sadly today there is only one surviving actor from the legendary front line, that being Ian Lavender. That ‘stupid boy’ has returned to the Fringe following his debut in last year’s Shawshank Redemption.

Lavender speaks honestly and emotionally of his time on the programme.

There is constant fascination with the British public as to the real stories that emanated from the production of the TV series, often voted the number one comedy in TV history and rightly so. Lavender speaks honestly and emotionally of his time on the programme.

Lavender, now 68, is at the age many of his co-stars where when they started filming the programme in 1968. It’s a very poignant moment when he says to the assembled audience, that his close friends were all so much older than him and sadly they are now all dead; he is indeed the last survivor.

There are many laughs from film clips that are shown from the series looking at the young Lavender in character as Pike, narrated by present-day Lavendar which is very touching. His acceptance of his place in a comedy legend is dealt with with incredible grace and dignity.

The hour long show ends with a question and answer session, where even more interesting details come out. Especially moving are Lavender’s recollections of losing James Beck (who played the spiv, Walker) at the age of 44 just as the programme was reaching its peak. He also speaks the truth when it comes to the 1971 motion picture which proved to a major problem for the cast and the show’s original creators.

The only letdown is that an hour is just not long enough! Lavender has such charm and warmth; that he should remain so proud of Dad’s Army and can keep the memories of those great actors he worked with alive, then so much the better.

Reviews by Brett Herriot

theSpace @ Surgeons Hall

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The Blurb

...but maybe he will! Enjoy an afternoon with Ian 'Stupid Boy' Lavender in conversation with Edinburgh's Steven McNicoll. Dad's Army was Ian's first professional job and he found himself thrown into a group of some of the best and funniest actors in the business. Dad's Army became one of the most popular and iconic television programmes on the BBC with a following which included Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother in her Scottish eyrie, who weekly delayed evening dinner to watch. Your questions welcomed and answered with truth and humour and accompanying visual clips.

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