Don't Drop the Egg

Comedy troupe GibbensMagnusJones’ YouTube mockumentary Don’t Drop The Egg, following the lives of three members of the fictional Clapham Falcons RFC, provided an effective and at times hilarious skewering of rugby lad culture. The group’s live show focuses on the dynamic between arrogant jock Archie Curzon (Gibbens), rugby nut goofball Oliver Blazeby (Jones) and their reluctant flatmate Freddie Shepherd (Magnus), but unfortunately fails to deliver on the promise shown in the original film.

Although the show is billed as ‘sketch comedy’, it is instead a ‘behind the scenes’ look at the Falcons’ changing room during a must-win game. The decision to set it here with the audience making up the rest of the squad was wise as it allowed the trio to successfully incorporate members into the show to good effect.

The script relies far too heavily on the character of Blazeby for its laughs. Jones is almost frighteningly convincing as the naïve rugger bugger and his Shakespearean closing monologue provides an amusing climax, but this just highlights the weaknesses of the other characters. Archie is almost too odious for an audience to care about at all, even when revealing his insecurities and Freddie - though meant to be the voice of reason amongst the madness - just comes across as insipid.

There is an inherent flaw in the concept of lampooning very tedious and obnoxious people as when the writing or acting isn’t sharp enough, the show itself becomes repetitive and brash. All three are clearly poking fun at their own backgrounds but there is a problem with this type of parody when its loses its satirical edge and begins to slip into an outright celebration of its supposed target, akin to Al Murray’s ‘pub landlord’ character.

There are also some ill-advised attempts at more surrealist humour that jar with the rest of the show. Archie makes a bizarre reference to a magical orb and the section with Freddie’s stalker Kate (who channels every bunny boiler cliché possible) which culminates in her faking both a pregnancy and her own death is just bemusing.

The live show does have a few excellent lines and a great performance by Jones. But Don’t Drop The Egg ultimately suffers because the trio appears to have run out of ways to mock a group of people who essentially parody themselves.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

The Blurb

GibbensMagnusJones present sketch comedy from the depths of the Clapham Falcons' changing room, where they will explore love, death, sex, war, friendship, failure, resentment, denial, jealousy, and sex, and death, and sex.

Most Popular See More

Moulin Rouge! The Musical

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Wicked

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Matilda the Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Back to the Future - The Musical

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Mamma Mia!

From £15.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Mousetrap

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets