Dirt

In the hope of a new start with her unborn child, Ada moves to Australia. We are soon informed from six feet under that her life hasn’t been going to plan.In another attempt to start afresh, Ada is now on a camping holiday with her new boyfriend Martin. While Martin is keen to share everything from his past to strengthen their relationship, Ada wants to keep them buried. Only it’s not entirely up to her – her now-dead mother has decided to come visit her in the forms of forest creatures, while her son surfaces back on land after having dug a tunnel from his grave.The absurdity of this tale is saved by a funny, intelligent and unconventional script and presentation. The show does an excellent job of switching between surreal comedy and disturbing psychodrama. The use of puppetry and a grown man playing the role of an eight year old is equally amusing and entertaining. Despite being a student production, the show is admirably professional and there is a mature, straightforward and serious tone behind all the silliness. Though it’s confusing at times, and finishes weakly (the audience realised the show had come to an end only after being prompted), the show is worth seeing even if just for it’s quirkiness.

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

The Blurb

Ada and Martin want to fall in love. But that's hard to do when your mother, reincarnated as an earwig, won't stop bothering you from beyond the grave. 'Go see whatever they put on' **** (Scotsman).

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