Diary of a Dating Addict

'Finding a partner's like finding a job: you've got to put the work in', says Maddy Anholt, and she would know. Prompted by the prospect of reaching the grand old age of 30 without that special someone in her life, 27-year-old Anholt spent a year trying to find Mr Right online. The amusing, edited lowlights of her experiences form the basis of Diary of a Dating Addict.

Anholt comes up with a selection of refreshingly schmaltz-free, #relationshipgoals

As well as some god-awful puns, and the obligatory Edinburgh Fringe 2015 references to Rolf Harris and Bill Cosby, Anholt's story is punctuated with well-observed character comedy. She introduces us to four of the morons (all of whom suffer from a severe lack of manners and self awareness), that she met during her internet search for a suitable other half.

She also outlines the reasons why, in her opinion, being single's great, and why it sucks. And she provides some social commentary on the topic by comparing and contrasting the harsh world of modern day, app-powered dating, with the ways in which people have formed romantic relationships in the past.

There's also some playful mocking of the convention of presenting a stylised, and meticulously curated, version of your best, sexiest and most popular self. And Anholt comes up with a selection of refreshingly schmaltz-free #relationshipgoals.

But the stigma that initially surrounded online dating has disappeared, and most of us have related (horror) stories of our own. So we all know that some people's profiles are carefully crafted compendiums of lies, you meet strangers who you aren't attracted to and/or have nothing in common with, and that more than a few of them will be self-centred nutjobs.

Anholt's amiable, and Diary of a Dating Addict is well-performed and solidly written. But, although it's an entertaining hour, this show's not particularly illuminating. It's not adding any new perspectives and insights into, or conclusions about, the stock of knowledge about this area of contemporary culture.

Broadway Baby Radio interview with Maddy Anholt

Reviews by Dawn Kofie

Assembly Hall

Adam Hills: Clown Heart

★★★★★
Laughing Horse @ The Counting House

Underwhelmed

★★★
Gilded Balloon

Diary of a Dating Addict

★★★
The Stand Comedy Club 5 & 6

Jena Friedman: American C*nt

★★★★
Gilded Balloon

Wasted

★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
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Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
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Performances

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The Blurb

With 30 approaching like the Grim Wrinkler, Maddy Anholt goes online to find her perfect prince. In this outrageous one-woman comedy, Maddy reveals every hilarious detail of a whirlwind year of dating, mating and hating. Following the five-star sell-out success of her debut Edinburgh Fringe show, Maddy is back with this audacious new comedy. Known for her 'effortless transformations' (Comedy.co.uk), riotous characters and hysterical observations. ***** (EdFringeReview.com). 'Nothing short of brilliant' **** (BroadwayBaby.com). 'A remarkable talent' (ThreeWeeks). '...make sure you see this' (Funnywomen.com). Kindly sponsored by MySingleFriend.com.

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