Dave Gorman's Power Point Presentation

Dave Gorman has formed a double act - with a projection screen. Gorman's history with the device is familiar to most of his fans – the majority of his shows relying heavily on graphs and charts and bullet points – but here he takes the gimmick to whole new, fantastic levels, making the PowerPoint bigger, better and longer than ever before. In a comedy scene where the PowerPoint usage that Gorman popularised is increasingly commonplace, here he reclaims his hallmark trope in fine style.Yet it is not the scale of the project that is most impressive, but the way Gorman's material forms so perfectly around it. The reliance on the screen gives him the opportunity to structure verbal jokes around visual reveals and to react to and against all sorts of found material. In turn his big screen reacts to Gorman's own activity, sometimes playing the straight man to his clown, sometimes the other way round. It really is a character in itself.If there is one theme that connects the material here, it is media saturation and fallibility of information in the multimedia age. It just about permeates every topic, although the funniest section of the show is the one it has ostensibly least to do with – a section in which Gorman explores the common, mistaken assumption that he is Jewish. He presents countless examples of his reported Jewishness and transforms his comic persona to ever new angry heights before tripping the audience up into laughing at the least opportune moment.But for all this, it is not one of Gorman's most remarkable shows – its content and topicality is nowhere near as exciting or innovative as, say, the Googlewack Adventure or his cult BBC2 classic the Important Astrological Experiment. There is no over-arching narrative here and no sense of anything being at stake. Just as Gorman worries in the show that technology is overtaking the real world, so does his technological challenge distract him from the good old fashioned need to tell a story. Yet, perhaps it is worth it to see the culmination of such an interesting structural experiment and one of the single funniest shows of this year's Fringe.

Reviews by Tom Moyser

Laughing Horse @ The Free Sisters

The Girl with the Hurricane Hands (and Other Short Tales of Woe)

★★★
Pleasance Courtyard

A Tale of Two Cities: Blood for Blood

★★
Traverse Theatre

Breakfast Plays: Tech Will Tear Us Apart (?)

★★★★
theSpace @ Jury's Inn

Droll

★★★★
Summerhall

The Castle Builder

★★★
Summerhall

4D Cinema

★★★★★

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