Cirque Tsuki: Parade

The concept of Cirque Tsuki’s final instalment of its trilogy is strong. Based on the Japanese ghost story of Izanami and Izanagi, Parade begins - fittingly - with us being paraded into the venue itself. The premise is excitingly metatheatrical, as circus performers confess they are in the midst of an experiment that we are about to join. Welcomed into a darkened series of passageways at the top of C Nova by an enthusiastic Millicent Wilkie as Tiffin, a living doll, it all feels very Punchdrunk and delightfully so. Waiting in anticipation we’re drawn into this immersive piece by a mysterious veiled woman, one of the most naturalistic actors of the evening and a talent that seems wasted in the corner pressing buttons to unleash dry ice.

Alongside the engaging mime work of Laurie Harrington, the stage shows that it can successfully come to life when given the chance.

We enter the tale at a point of enticing intensity, in the middle of the telling of one hundred supernatural tales, where one hundred candles have been lit in honour of the hundred stories told. We have reached number ninety-seven, it is almost dark: little time remains. When all tales are told, the teller “The Great Zanagi” (Owen Templeton) hopes to revive his dead wife into the world of the living. The world of performer and performance collides and dangerous overlaps ensue.

At times the efforts to immerse seem awkwardly imposed. With the audience being drawn in as two separate groups, a confused split is created whereby we’re addressed by different speakers side by side, a set up that feels awkward and unnecessarily complicated. Also, despite the exciting start that seems to promise a performance that shifts between rooms, we remain in a conventionally static seating position throughout, with little extrapolation on the initial immersive themes.

The most exciting moments of this production are those in which the performers actually act out the tales they tell. Simple but effective, a few flutters transform a sheet into the dangerous depths of a turgid river. Alongside the engaging mime work of Laurie Harrington, the stage shows that it can successfully come to life when given the chance.

As the climax of the Cirque Tsuki trilogy, Parade promises a lot, but despite its admirable efforts to engage and immerse the audience, this production remains at best a valiant effort and still feels somewhat unfinished. 

Reviews by Thea Hawlin

Zoo Southside

Beyond the Body

★★
Zoo

Icarus

★★★
Zoo Southside

An Invitation

★★★
Zoo Southside

Pss Pss

★★★★
Scottish National Portrait Gallery

John Ruskin: Artist and Observer

★★★★
Blackwell's Bookshop

Blackwell's Writers at the Fringe

★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £600,000 to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

Performances

Location

The Blurb

Parade comes from the furthest reaches of Japan, inspired by Izanagi and Izanami. The Cirque Tsuki is playing A Gathering of One Hundred Supernatural Tales, where 100 candles are lit and 100 ghost stories are told. The story goes that when the last candle is extinguished all the ghosts summoned will appear. The final tale is of Izanagi and his strange journey into the underworld in search of his lost love. Parade is last in the trilogy. 'A fantastic five-star piece of theatre' (RemoteGoat.com).

Most Popular See More

Hairspray

From £22.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Matilda the Musical

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Everybody's Talking About Jamie

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Life of Pi

From £19.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £25.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Phantom of the Opera

From £31.00

More Info

Find Tickets