Bruised Blueberries

Rosalind Adler's monologue, Bruised Blueberries, tackles subjects as gritty as adultery, suicide and paedophilia, from the point of view of five diverse women in a local village community.

Anna, the vicar's wife, runs a weekly self-improvement class for her husband's flock. Anna's altruism is misplaced, however, and her manipulation of others ultimately does more harm than good - but she never quite sees this. Even the suicide of one of her ladies is seen more as an inconvenience to her, since it requires the re-scheduling of one of her lectures.

Adler plays all five roles, and creates believable characterisations of the very different women. The show does suffer from a slow start, as it's not totally clear whether this is theatre or a Spotlight showreel. The nature of the scene changes, and the fact that a single actor has to perform all the roles, makes the early part of the show seem fractured. A voice-over track does go some way to plastering over the cracks in the action; but maybe this story would be better served with an actor for each role.

Overall this is an unusual piece of work, well performed and worth a look.

Reviews by Pete Shaw

Assembly George Square Studios

The House

★★★★★
theSpace on the Mile

Grace Notes

★★★
Greenwich Theatre

The Jungle Book

★★★
Greenwich Theatre

A Midsummer Night's Dream

★★★★
Multiple Venues

A Spoonful Of Sherman

★★★★★
Pleasance Theatre

Assassins

★★★★

The Blurb

The Zoo, 6-29 Aug (not 17th) 2.35pm (1 hour 5 minutes)