Bridge to an Island

‘If others can write about it so can I’ says the main character in Bridge to an Island. A dubious line, it reveals a fantastically naïve philosophy. Sadly, not everyone can write. Tragically, Out of the Trunk Productions really, really can’t. The concept is under-developed, the characters pitiful stereotypes and the dialogue clichéd. In fact, clichéd doesn’t quite cover it: the script is simply a regurgitation of platitudes lacking in any real substance. Self indulgent and painful to watch Bridge to an Island left me at a complete loss.

It’s New Year’s Eve. An unspecified ‘Girl’ is singing Auld Lang Syne to herself for no particular reason. She is also angry, very angry - again for no particular reason - and intends to write stories to cheer herself up. I must admit I am unsure as to the mental state of the Girl. The piece might have made more sense if she was obviously psychotic. She tells us about her childhood where her dream was to bring the characters in her favourite stories to life. As she begins to write, we see the characters in her scenes brought to life on stage. Mainly love stories, they begin to take on a disturbing end and the Girl rips up her paper explaining that she ‘never meant to write it like that’. This happens on a predictable loop.

Each story is a replica of the next. We are taken through some dark material which only makes the experience more cringe-worthy. The characters are almost identical in their development, differing only in situation and sexuality (and costume). It doesn’t help that they are played by the same two actors who are simply not up to the task of multi-roling. The writing lacks any understanding or emotional depth, doing an injustice to material that is naturally serious and should be extraordinarily emotionally charged.

Bridge from an Island betrays a shocking lack of understanding of what makes good theatre and, more importantly, what makes a good script.

Reviews by Zoe Hunter Gordon

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Performances

The Blurb

Out of The Trunk will unlock your minds to imagine different eras of the 20th century. Exploring isolation, through music and monologues, and the role imagination plays. How far will your mind go to escape loneliness?

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