Brazil

Set at some point in a dystopian, not so distant future, one Scottish man is trying to go about his day to day life, living each moment as it comes, not in search of anything that lasts. In this darkly comic, intense and surreal piece of theatre, we are given insight into a Scotland which, as of right now, doesn’t exist, at a time when America is dropping bombs on Europe.

Performed with vigor and expertise, creating a powerful experience for the audience.

This is a one-man play, yet actor Angus Chisholm plays a plethora of parts, capably bringing a number of different characters to life. By giving set characters’ actions and phrases, such as his friend Cockroach, who spits behind him each time he makes a statement, it is easy to differentiate between the various roles. Despite this, the roles themselves seem to serve very little purpose. They do allow us to understand the life of the main character in greater detail, yet by the end of the play it still feels as though you have barely scratched the surface, and understand as little as you did entering the theatre.

Chisholm is an extremely talented actor, and though he has a thick Scottish accent in this play and uses a number of words and phrases which ‘technically’ do not exist yet, his excellent diction makes it easy to understand what he is saying. 

Technically there was very little wrong with this piece. Chisholm utilizes the space well, and the lighting subtly shifted to fit changes in pace and time. Overall, though it’s difficult at times to grasp what exactly is happening, it’s performed with vigor and expertise, creating a powerful experience for the audience. 

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Performances

Location

The Blurb

One Scot isn't looking for anything that lasts. In this darkly comic one-man show we join Doddy, Cockroach, The Malky and others as America litters Europe with bombs. Doddy tries to find order among the debris, the cynical wasteland that makes his home, our home, where even the angels flee. This play is about the search for humanity and meaning amidst the chaos of poverty and war. Brazil, by Ronan O'Donnell, is presented by new company ProdUse Theatre and performed by Angus Chisholm for the Fringe. Scottish the player, Scottish the play, Scottish the place.

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