Betty Oops

Betty Oops is a two woman mask and music performance that balances the mundane and the absurd to surprise and entertain. The set is simple, consisting of two large cubicles that the actors can get inside, move around in and emerge afresh whilst wearing new faces. The versatile elements of the set allow the audience to focus on the physicality of the masked characters.

The show stirs the imagination and invites the audience to connect with their inner playful spirit.

The storyline centres around Betty’s new job which is not as ordinary as it seems. The story begins in black and white and then slowly enters into a colourful land of play. As the drama unfurls so do the colours. In this magical world we meet a variety of different weird and wonderful masks. The boundaries between the real and fantasy are blurred, creating a sensational liminal space.

Simple lighting is used throughout which adds to the dramatic elements of the story, but doesn’t provide focus to certain masks leaving them quite dark and hard to see. This was a disappointment, as it doesn’t showcase the craftsmanship involved.

There were a few glitches with the mask technique. For example, the character Betty looks down a lot and I could not see her mask. Both actors wore professional black attire which helped to showcase the masks. Hélène Lenoir delivered a captivating visual and musical performance.The vision of Betty Oops was created by the talented Tracey Boot who plays Betty. She is a comical, loveable and at times silly character who is trying to find a sense of balance in her busy world of work and play. Not only did Tracey deliver an excellent physical performance, she also designed everything from the set to the exquisite masks.

The show stirs the imagination and invites the audience to connect with their inner playful spirit.

Reviews by Jenny Johnston

Assembly George Square Gardens

Back of the Bus

★★★★★
Greenside @ Royal Terrace

Betty Oops

★★★★
C venues - C

Playing Landscape

★★★★★
Zoo

Motion&Motion

★★★★★
C venues - C south

A Modernist Event

★★★★

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Performances

Location

The Blurb

Betty is a nervous but endearing young woman. She likes the simple pleasures of life. But now her new office job starts to disrupt her safe and known universe. How will she juggle her amusements and her responsibilities? This show combines full face mask, live music, text and mime. It’s humorous, poetic and above all it exudes visual strength. Thought-provoking theatre aimed at young people and adults facing similar conundrums: the pressures of responsibility, the difficult balance between work and the home, the heart and the head. After the show discuss these questions with the performers.

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