Autumn Fallin'

Autumn Fallin' plays out much like its flyer would suggest. The piece posits itself as a 'whirlwind Manhattan romance' that is 'suitable for anyone who's ever loved'. And that is precisely what it is; no false advertising here.

I am not usually inclined to enjoy stories viewed through such an Americana rose tint, however the good singing and other areas of the piece that worked well allowed me to be somewhat wrapped up in this conventional love story.

Every aspect of this performance is considered in the soft and friendly glow of the studio lights. The music, the set pieces and the actors themselves have a sweet (almost saccharine) quality to them. I say saccharine, not as a detraction, but more as an indication that the drama unfolds in this piece much like the sweetest of romantic comedies. I am not usually inclined to enjoy stories viewed through such an Americana rose tint, however the good singing and other areas of the piece that worked well allowed me to be somewhat wrapped up in this conventional love story.

In terms of the piece's production, Matt Pallants' musical direction and band, complete with double bass, add a professionalism to the play which only a live musical act can. The songs are mostly catchy enough to warrant their place within the show, yet upon leaving the theatre their similarities become evident and one realises they would benefit from more variety or individualism. The staging by Amy Marsh along with the interesting and inventive concept of a vocal protagonist yet a silent chorus were both more effective aspects of the performance. Still, however, some of the actors let this concept down by their inability to remain convincing under the admittedly difficult notion of complete silence on stage.

Again, to reiterate, enter this show with a soft and sentimental outlook and it will be complimented perfectly by the amber studio glow and inoffensive story and songs. High culture seekers and hard nosed cynics; avoid if you can.

Reviews by Duncan Grindall

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Performances

Location

The Blurb

A New York love affair brought to life in a score by kooky Dylan-esq folkster Jaymay. Hum-aloud melodies and a pencil crayon cityscape provide easy to access snapshots of a whirlwind Manhattan romance. Suitable for anyone who's ever loved!