This bitter-sweet musical errs self-consciously on the side of the sweet, providing a Rom Com where everything seems to go right. The bald storylines of Another Way’s six characters don’t give us much to go on – two people fall in love, two people struggle with illness, two people have to choose between artistic integrity and commercial gain – these are certainly stories we’ve seen before. What Another Way does well is to weave these strands together beautifully, and provides achingly tender accompaniment in music by singer-songwriter Benedict. What the show claims to do differently is to push its relentlessly positive agenda, something which Musical Theatre has of course been doing for at least a century, and which feels entirely alien to contemporary experience.

Interval Productions received excellent notices for their last musical at the Cockpit, Streets, which transferred to the Hackney Empire. Director Bo Boland shows how surely his finger is on the pulse of modern Musical Theatre by crafting seamless transitions from scene to song and providing some excellent expressive choreography. I query the opening sequence, a gesture at immersive theatre (in the least true sense) which had the audience kettled on stage for far too long with very little pay-off. The cast were particularly strong, from Matthew Collyer’s shy-but-sweet geek Alex, to the less adorable but equally engaging Bart Edwards as Toby the womaniser. Pitch-wise the vocal lines are consistently astronomical, so it was a welcome relief to hear Ria Cherrelle Horsford’s sultry alto sections as Vivien.

In a strange way this is a jukebox musical, except one in which you probably haven’t heard the music before. Benedict’s song-writing style feels touchingly genuine, although the actors found it difficult to find meaning in heavily repeated phrases, which work on an album but pose problems on stage. I did enjoy Another Way, but despite its emotionally truthful performances, choreography and music, I just couldn’t believe its message of happily ever after.

Reviews by James Robert Ball

Leicester Square Theatre

De Profundis

★★★★

Another Way

★★★

Solstice

★★★

The Walls

★★★

Since you’re here…

… we have a small favour to ask. We don't want your money to support a hack's bar bill at Abattoir, but if you have a pound or two spare, we really encourage you to support a good cause. If this review has either helped you discover a gem or avoid a turkey, consider doing some good that will really make a difference.

You can donate to the charity of your choice, but if you're looking for inspiration, there are three charities we really like.

Mama Biashara
Kate Copstick’s charity, Mama Biashara, works with the poorest and most marginalised people in Kenya. They give grants to set up small, sustainable businesses that bring financial independence and security. That five quid you spend on a large glass of House White? They can save someone’s life with that. And the money for a pair of Air Jordans? Will take four women and their fifteen children away from a man who is raping them and into a new life with a moneymaking business for Mum and happiness for the kids.
Donate to Mama Biashara now

Theatre MAD
The Make A Difference Trust fights HIV & AIDS one stage at a time. Their UK and International grant-making strategy is based on five criteria that raise awareness, educate, and provide care and support for the most vulnerable in society. A host of fundraising events, including Bucket Collections, Late Night Cabarets, West End Eurovision, West End Bares and A West End Christmas continue to raise funds for projects both in the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa.
Donate to Theatre MAD now

Acting For Others
Acting for Others provides financial and emotional support to all theatre workers in times of need through the 14 member charities. During the COVID-19 crisis Acting for Others have raised over £1.7m to support theatre workers affected by the pandemic.
Donate to Acting For Others now

The Blurb

With a cast that includes West End regular Julie Atherton (she originated the role of Kate Monster/Lucy the Slut in Avenue Q and made her West End debut in he lead role of Sophie in MammaMia!), Another Way is three short stories about three London-based couples - friends, family and lovers - over the course of three months. It’s about luck in its different forms, from feeling lucky to being struck by luck, by a chance meeting. It’s about hope, it’s about getting stronger, and staying up later, for the 'dawn of our glory days'.

Most Popular See More

The Play That Goes Wrong

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Come From Away

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

My Fair Lady

From £24.00

More Info

Find Tickets

The Lion King

From £30.00

More Info

Find Tickets

Frozen the Musical

From £29.00

More Info

Find Tickets

SIX

From £21.00

More Info

Find Tickets